Welcome to Helensburgh

First World War Recruits Linked To Helensburgh & District (2508 Postcode)

Unknown WWI soldierOur latest research project has been on listing all men associated with the Helensburgh & District area (Postcode 2508) who enlisted with the Australian Imperial Forces for service in the First World War.

History Of Royal National Park

Judith Carrick's 'History of Royal National Park' is now available. This is the first published comprehensive history of the Park. Cost is $35 plus $3 postage. To order email jcarrick@ihug.com.au

Open Day At The Old Mine Surgery

 

The story of Pte William Barrie is just one of the WWI stories which will be highlighted in our next Open Day on 12 April 2014. For more information, read more:

Tom Anderson Q & A, Helensburgh Mushroom Co Pty Ltd

Growing mushrooms inside the old Helensburgh Railway Tunnel

Thank you to www.helensburgh.com.au for the following: An interview with Tom Anderson, former resident of Helensburgh and son to Mr Bill [William Franklin] Anderson and Jean Anderson [nee Griffiths] founders of the Helensburgh Mushroom Co Pty Ltd.

Bill Anderson operated a mushroom in one of the old railway tunnels in Helensburgh, New South Wales, from circa 1948 until 1970. http://www.helensburgh.com.au/history/tom-anderson-helensburgh-mushroom/

Garrawarra (waterfall) Cemetery

Garrawarra (Waterfall) Cemetery

Update on Garrawarra Cemetery.

Wollongong Council has provided a very poignant short video on the cemetery. You can find it on Wollongong Council's web page about Garrawarra Cemetery. http://haveyoursaywollongong.com.au/projects/waterfall-general-garrawarra-cemetery. There is also a great opportunity for interested persons to provide input into the future of the Cemetery via records@wollongong.nsw.gov.au before 15 November 2013 and quote the reference number ESP-100.06.010 in your submission.

Black Christmas

Illustration: Doug Tolhurst, former Olympian, of The Ridge Helensburgh, stayed and saved his home.
Christmas day started out fine, but with a strong southwesterly wind. The wind increased by lunchtime, but townsfolk busied themselves with the usual Christmas celebrations. Many headed out of town to be with family, others entertained family visitors. The local church services were well attended; all was normal.

The Bottom-end Shops

The village of Helensburgh originally developed between the school and the railway. The first shops were the Post Office store down from the school and two shops opposite the Norm O'Brien park: a small store carrying groceries and vegetables, now the home of Bruce and Lee King, and a butchery (illustrated).
The butchery was established by George Luck, taken over by his son Alf Luck, and then his son Ken Luck. Tex Griffith was the last employee to work in the shop. As the town moved up to the plateau, George established a second butchery opposite the Centennial pub.

Pages